I was in Europe weeks ago and one of the coolest things I saw was this Anti Aircraft Tower, or Flak …

I was in Europe weeks ago and one of the coolest things I saw was this Anti Aircraft Tower,I was in Europe weeks ago and one of the coolest things I saw was this Anti Aircraft Tower, or Flak ... or Flak Tower from World War II. All of this footage I captured in 4k with my DJI Mavicdrone. Some of you guys might recognize this tower from the Medal of Honor video game where youget sucked out of a destroyed airplane and parachute down onto the top of the tower itself. 25 Easy and Elegant Thanksgiving Centerpieces The towers could fire 8,000 anti aircraft rounds per minute, and had an effective range of about 8 miles. This tower is legitimately a real place right here in Vienna, the largest city in Austria. It’s a 54 meter tall anti aircraft tower that ironically is just about the same heightas the Statue of Liberty herself.
Hitler commissioned8 of these complexes during the 2nd WorldWar to help protect his cities against the allied air attacks. The one you’re looking at right now was built just after 1940. If you remember, Hitleris that delusional lunatic who discriminated against people based purely on their religion. 20 Beautiful Backyard Patio Design Ideas This particular complex in Augarten has 2 towers: a square tower that held the observationand radio equipment, and the round tower that held all of the anti air firepower. The sheer size of these towers is impressive. They also doubled as bunkers to help protectcivilians during an attack. At one point during a battle in Berlin, the tower held an estimated30,000 civilians inside.
Some very terrible things happened during World War II. Contrary to the video game though,these two towers in Augarten never saw much action. The allied forces tended to avoidthe areas where the towers were located, for obvious reasons. I’m sure they wanted tokeep their airplanes from looking like Swiss cheese. Today the towers are closed off and in serious need of repair. They are way too enormousto be cost effectively torn down since the walls are 3 ½ meters thick. That’s 11 feetof solid concrete.
So here they still stand today as a reminder of the past; a memorialfor mistakes, or a physical monument that hopes current world leaders can learn from historyand not build ginormous, unnecessary concrete structures.